Pupils need lessons to survive in an internet-dominated world

21 March 2017
Pupils need lessons to survive in an internet-dominated world

Digital literacy should be the fourth pillar of a child's education, according to House of Lords Report

 

Lessons about online responsibilities, risks and acceptable behaviour should be mandatory in all UK schools, the Lords Communications Committee has argued.

According to the House of Lords Report, learning to survive in a world dominated by the internet should be as important for pupils as reading and writing.

Committee chairman Lord Best said that while the internet can be "hugely beneficial" to children they also need awareness of its hazards. The report argues that "digital literacy should be the fourth pillar of a child's education alongside reading, writing and mathematics and be resourced and taught accordingly".

The Lords report builds on findings by the Children's Commissioner for England in January, namely that the internet is not designed for children, despite them being the biggest users by age group.

Recommendations include:

  • Content control filters and privacy settings to be "on" by default for all customers

  • All online businesses to respond quickly to requests by children to remove content

  • A children's digital champion to be appointed to argue for their rights at the highest levels of government

  • An industry summit, chaired by the prime minister, on redesigning the internet to

  • All online businesses to respond quickly to requests by children to remove content

  • A children's digital champion to be appointed to argue for their rights at the highest levels of government

  • An industry summit, chaired by the prime minister, on redesigning the internet to serve children better.

    It concludes: "This issue is of such critical importance for our children that the government, civil society and all those in the internet value chain must work together to improve the opportunities and support where the end user is a child."

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-39329967

     

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